About Statewide Variety Testing

Proper variety selection is the most important decision a farmer makes. Farmers want and need to grow the best adapted crop cultivars to be successful. But producers do not have the time or the resources to plant more than a few cultivars to determine which are best adapted to Georgia growing conditions. That’s where UGA Agronomists step in to help. 

The college’s Variety Testing Team does the work and research for the farmers  We perform variety research on public and private developed cultivars of corn, corn silage, soybean, peanut, cotton, grain sorghum, wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale, canola, summer annual forages, and winter annual forages each crop year. The research is conducted in multiple geographic regions of Georgia to collect agronomic data such as yield, bloom date, maturity date, test weight, height, lodging, seed size and seed shattering; also, tests for resistance/tolerance to pests and disease.

Variety Research information is published annually in four research reports:

  • Winter Grains and Forages
  • Corn and Sorghum
  • Soybeans
  • Cotton & Peanuts

Reports are made available to farmers, private industry, and other researchers in a timely manner and are accessible below.



Reports


Winter Grains & Forages

Corn & Sorghum

Soybeans

Cotton & Peanuts

George Vellidis, a professor in the department of crop and soil sciences and University Professor, reviews surface water runoff data with students at the UGA Tifton campus. (Photo by Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA) CAES News
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The University of Georgia is leveraging faculty expertise and strengthening industry ties through a new Institute for Integrative Precision Agriculture whose research and outreach will help sustainably feed a growing global population.
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