About Statewide Variety Testing

Proper variety selection is the most important decision a farmer makes. Farmers want and need to grow the best adapted crop cultivars to be successful. But producers do not have the time or the resources to plant more than a few cultivars to determine which are best adapted to Georgia growing conditions. That’s where UGA Agronomists step in to help. 

The college’s Variety Testing Team does the work and research for the farmers  We perform variety research on public and private developed cultivars of corn, corn silage, soybean, peanut, cotton, grain sorghum, wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale, canola, summer annual forages, and winter annual forages each crop year. The research is conducted in multiple geographic regions of Georgia to collect agronomic data such as yield, bloom date, maturity date, test weight, height, lodging, seed size and seed shattering; also, tests for resistance/tolerance to pests and disease. 

The information is published annually in four research reports which are made available to farmers, private industry, and other researchers in a timely manner. These reports are accessible through the winter crop and summer crop tabs at the top of our website.


Large patch disease, pictured here, can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible. CAES News
Large patch disease, pictured here, can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible.
Keep your lawn disease-free with these tips from UGA Extension
As warm-season turfgrasses continue to green up, diseases are rearing their ugly heads. The main culprit this time of year is a fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, that causes large patch disease in lawns. Large patch can infect all warm-season turfgrasses, but centipede, St. Augustine, and zoysia are particularly susceptible.
A DSSAT training workshop that draws international participation is held on the University of Georgia Griffin campus each year. This year, 35 researchers attended the workshop, held from May 17 to 21, to learn the latest version of the precision agriculture software. CAES News
A DSSAT training workshop that draws international participation is held on the University of Georgia Griffin campus each year. This year, 35 researchers attended the workshop, held from May 17 to 21, to learn the latest version of the precision agriculture software.
Computer software helps solve what-if questions in agriculture
Anyone familiar with agriculture knows that a successful harvest largely relies on environmental factors. An especially hot summer with no rain in sight or poor soil quality can cause as many problems as a late cold snap right in the middle of planting season. Often farmers must rely on trial and error to get the best results. But for agricultural scientists, the guessing game can be reduced thanks to a computer software program called Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT).
UGA Weather Network Director Pam Knox checks one of the data-logger boxes maintained by the network. All of the observational instruments connect to the data-logger, which collects and transmits weather data at 15-minute intervals, which is then disseminated through the UGA Weather Network website. CAES News
UGA Weather Network Director Pam Knox checks one of the data-logger boxes maintained by the network. All of the observational instruments connect to the data-logger, which collects and transmits weather data at 15-minute intervals, which is then disseminated through the UGA Weather Network website.
UGA Weather Network celebrates 30 years of service to agriculture in Georgia
On June 1, 1991, the first agricultural weather station operated by the University of Georgia began transmitting data from Griffin, Georgia. Since then, the UGA Weather Network has grown to include 87 stations scattered across the state, providing weather data to a variety of users. On June 1 this year, this 30-year record of continuous weather data makes the UGA Weather Network one of the oldest state weather networks in the country.