About Statewide Variety Testing

Proper variety selection is the most important decision a farmer makes. Farmers want and need to grow the best adapted crop cultivars to be successful. But producers do not have the time or the resources to plant more than a few cultivars to determine which are best adapted to Georgia growing conditions. That’s where UGA Agronomists step in to help. 

The college’s Variety Testing Team does the work and research for the farmers  We perform variety research on public and private developed cultivars of corn, corn silage, soybean, peanut, cotton, grain sorghum, wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale, canola, summer annual forages, and winter annual forages each crop year. The research is conducted in multiple geographic regions of Georgia to collect agronomic data such as yield, bloom date, maturity date, test weight, height, lodging, seed size and seed shattering; also, tests for resistance/tolerance to pests and disease. 

The information is published annually in four research reports which are made available to farmers, private industry, and other researchers in a timely manner. These reports are accessible through the winter crop and summer crop tabs at the top of our website.


UGA researchers have been looking for ways to reverse the decline of pollinator populations by examining centipedegrass as a food source for pollinators. CAES News
UGA researchers have been looking for ways to reverse the decline of pollinator populations by examining centipedegrass as a food source for pollinators.
Your lawn could help save the bees
Over the past few decades, pollinators have been in decline worldwide, which is concerning because 70% of crops used for human food depend on pollinators. Turfgrasses – used for most residential lawns – often take some of the blame for pollinator decline as they are known to be wind-pollinated and were thought not to serve as a pollinator food source, until now.
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. CAES News
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately.
Groundnut animation shows keys to late-season success
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. The animations, produced by Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO), relay to smallholder farmers proven methods to protect and improve yield. The message of the videos was shaped through interviews and surveys with partners in Africa to ensure that the information is prioritized to have the most impact.
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop. CAES News
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop.
Student Profile: Tapping ancient genes helps to fight modern diseases
Danielle Essandoh always liked plants, but as she prepares to defend her master’s thesis for a degree in plant breeding from Makerere University in Uganda, she sees how her love of plants grew into a passion for helping people. Specifically, the work could lead to improved varieties that can withstand two particular diseases that can destroy groundnut crops in eastern Africa – groundnut rosette disease and late leaf spot.